Machine Shop / Locomotive Drive Work

Discuss All Facets of 2-Rail, 1/48 Scale, Model Railroading
bob turner
Posts: 11407
Joined: Sat Jan 13, 2007 7:57 pm

Re: Machine Shop / Locomotive Drive Work

Postby bob turner » Sun Mar 28, 2021 12:18 pm

Look at the size of that building! Do we see another major O Scale layout about to be created?
In contrast, my little kitchen shop is now so overwhelmed by tools, parts, and little scraps of brass that it is difficult to even park a PA there, let alone cut some windows.
But nevertheless, before heading to the airport today, I am cutting PA windows! Onward!
Wish I could paint like those HO artists.

Chris Webster
Posts: 599
Joined: Mon May 25, 2015 7:25 pm

Re: Machine Shop / Locomotive Drive Work

Postby Chris Webster » Sun Mar 28, 2021 4:25 pm

R.K. Maroon wrote:they finally poured the pier-and-beam foundation last week

Are the piers necessary because of bad soil or do you just want to ensure that your lathe remains stable? :D

User avatar
R.K. Maroon
Posts: 2534
Joined: Tue Feb 22, 2011 9:20 pm

Re: Machine Shop / Locomotive Drive Work

Postby R.K. Maroon » Sun Mar 28, 2021 11:10 pm

bob turner wrote:Look at the size of that building! Do we see another major O Scale layout about to be created?

I admit that the temptation to build some "great" O-scale layout is there, but my principal interest is in restoration of old models. As such, the primary purpose of the building is to host all the man-toys of my shop: mill, lathes, drill presses, saws, media blasting booth, paint booth, electrical work station, test bench, grinders, sanders, etc. But...having a basic layout for test runs is an important asset. Given this, I have sized the building to be big enough for all the gear with enough room leftover to setup the existing portable layout (when not otherwise off at a train show). This layout is not "great" but is better than just a loop of track, so I will also have the more general pleasure of running trains for the fun of it, which I am admittedly looking forward to. We'll see if I can resist the temptation to go beyond that. If I break down, it will be to add a loop of track with overhead catenary.

Chris Webster wrote:Are the piers necessary because of bad soil or do you just want to ensure that your lathe remains stable? :D

Good question, Chris. This part of North Texas is famous for its "gumbo" black soil. It has a lot of clay, which causes all sorts of problems with expansion during wet spells and contraction during the droughts (the cracks get big enough to swallow golf balls whole on the local courses). Pier and beam construction tends to be more stable, and, when it does shift, the floors can be readily leveled without mud jacking, which is an imprecise art at best. I look at it as a pay-me-know, pay-me-later choice. Most builders choose "pay me later" and build with slabs. I half-justified the choice with the notion that a suspended wood floor is at least a bit forgiving when a model commits suicide by flinging itself off the layout. Concrete, by contrast, is not forgiving at all.

By the way, here is a photo from today. They came and stripped off the forms yesterday afternoon, which was not expected.

Image
Fun stuff indeed


Return to “O-Gauge, 2-Rail, Model Railroading”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 16 guests